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October 23-26, 2017 - Prague, Czech Republic
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LinuxCon Tracks [clear filter]
Monday, October 23
 

11:15

A Gentle Introduction to [e]BPF - Michael Schubert, Kinvolk GmbH
BPF is a Linux in-kernel virtual machine that is used for networking, tracing, seccomp and more. This talk will explore BPF in Linux from the bottom up, going from its roots in the BSD Packet Filter (now often called classic or cBPF) to today’s [e]xtended BPF. Starting with an overview of the the BPF instruction set, helper functions and data stores (maps), the presentation will give an approachable introduction into development, debugging and usage of BPF programs on Linux.

Speakers
MS

Michael Schubert

Software Engineer, Kinvolk GmbH
Michael is a Software Engineer from Berlin where he works on low-level Linux software at Kinvolk GmbH, a Linux development company. Before that, he was working as a Backend and Operations Engineer for a Swiss Infrastructure-as-a-Service provider. He is a maintainer of gobpf, a Go... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 11:15 - 11:55
Athens/Barcelona

11:15

Automating Open Source License Compliance - Filling in the Missing Pieces - Kate Stewart, The Linux Foundation
From upstreams through the supply chain to consumer products, open source sharing of code has enabled an unprecedented rate of innovation and new products. Complying with the respective open source licenses in the code is not always as easy as picking up the code and integrating it though. All to often, the licensing information for key software is overlooked, inaccurate or hard to find. Significant progress has been made in the last year to improving this, but there are some gaps still remaining. This talk will review the open source solutions available (and missing) for helping to make licensing compliance and security information more transparent, and able to keep up with the pace of innovation.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Stewart

Kate Stewart

Sr. Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation
Kate Stewart is a Senior Director of Strategic Programs, responsible for the Open Compliance programs encompassing the SPDX, FOSSology, OpenChain, and other compliance related projects. Kate was one of the founders of SPDX, and is currently the specification lead. Since joining... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 11:15 - 11:55
Berlin/Brussels

11:15

x86 Platform Drivers - Darren Hart, VMware
x86 platform drivers cover the final bits of integration that make things like hotkeys, LEDs, radio switches, and screen orientation work on laptops, as well as certain aspects of thermal and power management work across all types of platforms. They make or break the first time user experience with many platforms, and yet are inevitably one of the last things to be completed due to a variety of challenges. Besides the obvious lack of OEM participation and hardware availability, developing these platform drivers is complicated by systems designed for a fundamentally different software ecosystem. Darren will describe the nature of this subsystem, recent changes to scope, current development efforts and challenges, and leave attendees with an invitation to get involved with improving the scope of support using their own systems.

Speakers
DH

Darren Hart

Director, VMware
Darren has been involved in and around the Linux kernel since 2003, focusing on embedded platform enabling, real-time, and safety critical applications. He has maintained the Linux kernel x86 platform drivers since 2014. Darren recently joined the VMware Open Source Technology Center... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 11:15 - 11:55
Tyrolka

12:05

Code Detective: How to Investigate Linux Performance Issues - Gabriel Krisman, Collabora
What influences a program's performance? Some reasons are quite obvious, like the algorithm implemented and the number of execution cycles, but what about the order in which libraries were linked? Or the shell environment size? Or even the sequence and which compiler optimizations were applied? In fact, modern computer systems include such a multitude of features and options, whose interaction with each other can affect the workload's performance, that it is surprisingly hard to write code that fully benefits from the potential of the CPU. In this talk, we will discuss how small changes in the code and in the execution environment can impact the execution time and how you can use Linux performance assessment tools, like perf and valgrind, to detect and mitigate such pitfalls.

Speakers
GK

Gabriel Krisman

Software Engineer, Collabora
Gabriel Krisman Bertazi is a Software Engineer and Kernel developer with Collabora's kernel team, specializing in the Graphics stack and profiling technologies. Previously a member of the IBM Linux Technology Center Storage team, he also conducted scientific research on adaptive compilation... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 12:05 - 12:45
Berlin/Brussels

12:05

Debugging Usually Slightly Broken (USB) Devices and Drivers - Krzysztof Opasiak, Samsung R&D Institute Poland
USB is definitely the most common external interface. Millions of people are using it every day and thousands of them have problems with it. Driver not found, incorrect driver bound, kernel oops are just examples of common problems which we are all facing. How to solve them or at least debug? If you’d like to find out, then this talk is exactly for you! We will start with a gentle introduction to the USB protocol. Then standard Linux host side infrastructure will be discussed. How drivers are chosen? How can we modify matching rules of a particular driver? That's only couple of questions which will be answered in this part. Final part will be an introduction to USB communication sniffing. Krzysztof will show how to monitor and analyze USB traffic without expensive USB analyzers.

Speakers
avatar for Krzysztof Opasiak

Krzysztof Opasiak

Senior Software Engineer, Samsung R&D Institute Poland
Krzysztof Opasiak is a PhD student at Warsaw University of Technology. He works as Kernel and System Developer at Samsung R&D Institute Poland. Since 2013 involved in USB support development in Tizen OS. Maintainer of libusbgx, a library for USB gadgets management through ConfigFS... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 12:05 - 12:45
Tyrolka

12:05

Open Data - Mike Dolan, The Linux Foundation
Speakers
avatar for Michael Dolan

Michael Dolan

VP of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation
Michael Dolan is VP of Strategic Programs supporting open source projects and legal programs at The Linux Foundation. He has set up and launched dozens of open source and open standards projects covering technology segments including networking, virtualization, cloud, blockchain... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 12:05 - 12:45
Athens/Barcelona

14:20

Collaboration in Kernel Mailing Lists - Dawn Foster, The Scale Factory
While there is quite a bit of data about the people and companies who commit Linux kernel code, there isn't much data about how people work together on the kernel mailing lists where they decide what patches will be accepted. Using a few of the top subsystem mailing lists as examples, Dawn Foster will share her research into how people collaborate on the kernel mailing lists, including network visualizations of mailing list interactions between contributors. You can expect to learn more about the people, their employers, and other data that impacts how people participate on the mailing lists.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Foster

Dawn Foster

Consultant, The Scale Factory
Dawn is currently a part-time consultant at The Scale Factory and is pursuing a PhD at the University of Greenwich in London, which she plans to complete in mid-2018. She spent more than 20 years working at companies like Puppet Labs, Intel, Jive Software, and more. She has expertise... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 14:20 - 15:00
Athens/Barcelona
  • Experience Level Any

14:20

Hatching Security: LinuxKit as Security Incubator - Tycho Andersen and Riyaz Faizullabhoy, Docker Inc.
The host operating system and kernel are natural targets on machines which host containers, hostile or otherwise. In this talk we’ll discuss a new open source project called LinuxKit — which is part of the open source Moby Project, and led by Docker. LinuxKit is a tool for building Linux subsystems specifically designed to securely host containers. We’re making design decisions specific to our use case: read only host rootfs, small non-modularized config with most things disabled, etc.

We are actively working on upstreaming kernel features (e.g. teaching IMA about namespaces, so it can be sensibly used by containers), and incubating other projects such as Landlock, type-safe system daemons, and HPE’s okernel separation project. Additionally, we are interested collaborating on kernel hardening patches, and are interested in finding other collaboration opportunities at LSS.

Speakers
TA

Tycho Andersen

Software Engineer, Docker, Inc
Tycho is an engineer at Docker working on LinuxKit, a toolkit for building container-focused host operating systems out of Linux. In his spare time he rides bikes and does improv comedy. Tycho has been fortunate to speak at a number of industry conferences including linux.conf.au... Read More →
RF

Riyaz Faizullabhoy

Security Engineer, Docker, Inc
Riyaz works on the security team at Docker and is a maintainer of LinuxKit and Notary. Prior to Docker, Riyaz researched malware and systems security at UC Berkeley. Riyaz has also spoken at DockerCon, LinuxCon NA, ContainerCon EU, and past Docker meetups.


Monday October 23, 2017 14:20 - 15:00
Tyrolka

14:20

What's in a Kernel Oops? - Vlastimil Babka, SUSE
If you have been using Linux for some time, you must have seen at least one kernel oops or panic, because sadly no software is completely free of bugs. You probably submitted the report to a mailing list (after wondering which one to use to reach the right developers), and hopefully got the bug fixed. Did you wonder, what can the report actually tell the developers? In this session, Vlastimil Babka will explain it literally line by line on few real-world examples. The next time you see a kernel oops, you should have much better idea what went wrong, who to blame, or even submit a fix yourself!

Speakers
avatar for Vlastimil Babka

Vlastimil Babka

Linux Kernel Developer, SUSE
Vlastimil is a Linux kernel developer working at SUSE, focusing on memory management. Previously he was a Gentoo Linux developer.



Monday October 23, 2017 14:20 - 15:10
Berlin/Brussels

15:10

Comparison of Foss Distributed Storage - Marian Marinov, SiteGround
Marian will compare the performance and reliability of some of the most used distributed storage systems:
- Ceph
- GlusterFS
- DRBD + NFS
- OrangeFS
- MooseFS
In this talk you will not only see some stats, but also tunning options and a ton of bugs found in testing and production environments with the above setups. You will see failure scenarious that may seam imposible. Finally you will see recomendations for different types of workload.

Speakers
MM

MARIAN MARINOV

Chief System Architect, SiteGround
Marian is a system administrator by heart. He is working with Linux for more than 20 years. Currently he is Chief System Architect at SiteGround – world leading web hosting and IT provider. | He is a big fan of FOSS and regularly speaks at different conferences around the world... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 15:10 - 15:50
Berlin/Brussels

15:10

Contain Your Desktop Applications with Flatpak - Lili Cosic, Kinvolk
Flatpak is the new way of packaging and running applications that is compatible across different Linux distributions. In this talk we will explore Flatpak’s internal sandboxing mechanisms and see how painless it is to install and run applications. Furthermore we will walk through all the components needed to package an application. At the end of the presentation there will also be a demo to show Flatpak in the wild.

Speakers
avatar for Lili Cosic

Lili Cosic

Software Developer, Kinvolk
Lili is a Software Developer at Kinvolk, a Berlin-based Linux development consultancy, where she works on a variety of projects surrounding Linux. Currently she is working on a Habitat Operator, a controller to easily create and manage Habitat Services on Kubernetes. In her free time... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 15:10 - 15:50
Athens/Barcelona
  • Experience Level Any

15:10

Trolling != Enforcement - Shane Coughlan, OpenChain Project
This talk will the difference between copyright enforcement and "trolling" around Open Source licenses. It will explore what has happened in our space during the last five years, how organizations have reacted, and what is likely to occur next. The focus will be on lessons learned and how these lessons can be applied to real-world commercial situations.

Speakers
avatar for Shane Coughlan

Shane Coughlan

General Manager, The Linux Foundation
Shane Coughlan is an expert in communication, security and business development. His professional accomplishments include spearheading the licensing team that elevated Open Invention Network into the largest patent non-aggression community in history, establishing the leading professional... Read More →


Monday October 23, 2017 15:10 - 15:50
Tyrolka

16:20

CRIU: CRazI stUff for the Mainframe? - Michael Holzheu, IBM
2012, January 12, 20:42: Linus Torvalds merges Andrew's "patch-bomb" with the
first CRIU kernel patches including the comment "... a project by various mad
Russians to perform c/r mainly from userspace".

Now, five years later, Docker decided to integrate this project for
checkpointing their containers. A valid reason for us to check out if this
can also be good stuff for the Mainframe. After looking at the code at least
one thing is clear now - it is ... crazy.

In this presentation we explain the deep technical details of checkpointing
Linux processes in userspace including the Mainframe specific parts. We also
show how CRIU can be used for Docker container checkpoints and for other
promising scenarios.

So, Mission critical workload with CRIU or Mission impossible?

Speakers
avatar for Michael Holzheu

Michael Holzheu

Mr., IBM
Michael Holzheu is a Linux kernel developer at the IBM lab in Boeblingen, Germany. He studied computer science at the University of Erlangen and has worked for IBM since 1998. After a start in the z/OS UNIX Systems Services environment, he joined the Linux on z Systems team in 2000... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 16:20 - 17:00
Berlin/Brussels

16:20

Detecting Performance Regressions in the Linux Kernel - Jan Kara, SUSE
Performance of the Linux kernel is one of the key features for its users. Despite this fact, systematic testing for performance regressions is relatively scarce because of its inherent difficulty. In this presentation, Jan Kara will introduce the test framework Marvin that is used within SUSE for performance testing of both distribution and upstream kernels. He will also review tests that are regularly run by this framework. Finally he will discuss challenges of the performance testing including examples of performance regressions detected by the framework and their analysis to demonstrate those challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Kara

Jan Kara

Kernel engineer, SUSE
Jan Kara is doing Linux kernel hacking in file systems area over 15 years. He is the maintainer of udf file system, and quota subsystem. He is also working on ext4 and other filesystems, writeback logic, notification framework, and other miscellaneous stuff. Currently he is working... Read More →


grid2 odp

Monday October 23, 2017 16:20 - 17:00
Athens/Barcelona

16:20

Tutorial: 'Goodbye! printf()' Hands-on with uftrace: Function Graph Tracer for C/C++ - Taeung Song, KOSSLAB
Want to look into the runtime behavior of your or other huge C/C++ programs ?
Need to trace and analyze them on both the user and kernel space ?

See how to efficiently do that using the uftrace tool. In this tutorial, Taeung will introduce the uftrace tool and do its useful practice examples with attendees step by step.

The uftrace tool is to trace and analyze execution of a program written in C/C++. It was heavily inspired by the ftrace framework of the Linux kernel (especially function graph tracer).

It can show detailed execution flow at function level, and report which function has the highest overhead. And it shows various information(e.g. arguments, return values ..) related the execution environment. The tool can also trace kernel functions as well.

Additionally Taeung will also explain internals of the uftrace tool e.g. Dynamic tracing, PLT hooking, mcount hooking to encourage attendees to get involve in the uftrace opensource project https://github.com/namhyung/uftrace if attendees have interest in these tracing technology.

Speakers
avatar for Taeung Song

Taeung Song

Software Engineer, KOSSLab
Taeung is a Software Engineer in KOSSLAB(Korea Opensource Software Developers Lab) and have been contributing to opensource projects such as the perf of Linux Kernel and uftrace: Function (graph) tracer since 2014. And he has a lot of concern for profiling & tracing technology e.g... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 16:20 - 17:50
Tyrolka
  • Experience Level Any

17:10

Kernel Live Patching: Current State and Future Development - Miroslav Benes, SUSE
Kernel Live Patching allows kernel patches to be applied to a running system without a reboot. It is a part of the Linux kernel mainline. In this talk, Miroslav will describe the current state of the solution, open challenges and thus future steps.

Speakers
MB

Miroslav Beneš

SUSE
Miroslav works at SUSE as a Linux kernel developer on a Live Patching product. He is a co-maintainer of upstream live patching solution. Previous speaking experience includes Linux Plumbers Conf 2016 and many conferences from his academic career.



Monday October 23, 2017 17:10 - 17:50
Berlin/Brussels
  • Experience Level Any

17:10

Rethinking the OS: A Travel Journal - Thorsten Kukuk, SUSE

A new wave of Operating Systems optimized for containers appeared on the horizon making us excited and puzzled at the same time.

"Why do we need anything different for containers when traditional OSs served us well in the last 25+ years?" "Isn't Kubernetes just another package to install on top of my favorite distro?" "Will this obsolete my whole infrastructure?" are some of the questions this talk will shed some light on.

Explore the journey SUSE made in rethinking the OS: From a conservative Linux distribution to a platform that goes hand in hand with the needs of Microservices.

You will get an insight at what lessons were learned during the intense development effort that lead to SUSE Containers as a Service Platform, how the obstacles along the way were lifted and why "Upstream first" is - and should always be - the rule.


Speakers
avatar for Thorsten Kukuk

Thorsten Kukuk

Distinguished Engineer, SUSE
Thorsten Kukuk has a master degree in computer science and started with Linux in 1992. Since 1999 he is working for SUSE. Formerly as release manager, now as Senior Architect SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. He was, among others, involved in the following open source projects: glibc... Read More →



Monday October 23, 2017 17:10 - 17:50
Athens/Barcelona

18:00

BoF: Fedora, CentOS and EPEL - Brian Exelbierd, Jim Perrin & Peter Robinson, Red Hat
The Fedora, CentOS and EPEL BoF will feature project leaders and coordinators to answer questions AMA style and help community members and new participants join together for success.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Exelbierd

Brian Exelbierd

Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator, Red Hat
Brian Exelbierd has over 13 years of experience in IT/IS ranging from programming to team leadership and business roles. He has worked for non-profits, for-profits and government. Brian joined Red Hat in 2014 to work on platform technologies and containers. Brian is currently the... Read More →
avatar for Peter Robinson

Peter Robinson

Principal IoT Architect, Red Hat
Peter is the lead architect for Linux IoT platforms at Red Hat. He's be at Red Hat over five years and done a number of roles, he's been an Open Source user and contributor since the mid 1990s, and has wide experience in IT from SME, large Telco/hosting providers and quite a bit in... Read More →


Monday October 23, 2017 18:00 - 18:45
Tyrolka
  • Experience Level Any
 
Tuesday, October 24
 

10:55

DSM, EIF, RED: Acronyms on the EU Level and Why They Matter for Software Freedom - Polina Malaja, Free Software Foundation Europe
In the coming years, the EU is determined to bring its industries to the digital market and acquire a leading position on the global tech market. In order to achieve this ambitious goal of allowing Europe's "own Google or Facebook" to emerge, the EU has come up with several political and legislative proposals that obviously cannot overlook software. Three or more magic letters combined in an acronym have, therefore, the power to either support innovation and fair competition, or drown the EU in its vendor lock-in completely. The terms "open standards", "open platforms", and Free Software are being used more and more often but does it mean that the EU is "opening" up for software freedom for real? My talk will explain how several current EU digital policies interact with Free Software, and each other, and what does it mean for software freedom in Europe.

Speakers
PM

Polina Malaja

Policy Analyst and Legal Coordinator, Free Software Foundation Europe
Polina Malaja is the Policy Analyst and the Legal Coordinator at the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE). Holding LL.M in International Human Rights Law and Intellectual Property Rights Law, she is deeply interested in interactions between fundamental rights and freedoms and technology... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 10:55 - 11:35
Berlin/Brussels

10:55

Fast and Precise Retrieval of Forward and Back Porting Information for Linux Device Drivers - Julia Lawall, Inria
Porting Linux device drivers to target more recent and older Linux kernel versions to compensate for changes in the kernel interface is a continual problem for Linux device driver developers. Acquiring information about interface changes is a necessary, but tedious and error prone, part of this task. We propose two tools, Prequel and gcc-reduce, to help collect the needed information. Prequel provides language support for querying git commit histories, while gcc-reduce generates Prequel queries from compiler error messages. We have used our approach in porting 33 device driver files over up to 3 years of Linux kernel history, amounting to hundreds of thousands of commits. In these experiments, for 3/4 of the porting issues, our approach highlighted commits that enabled solving the porting task. For many porting issues, our approach retrieves relevant commits in 30 seconds or less.

Speakers
JL

Julia Lawall

Senior Researcher, Inria
Julia Lawall is a Senior Research Scientist at Inria. Her research is at the intersection of programming languages and operating systems. She develops the tool Coccinelle and has over 2000 patches in the Linux kernel based on this work. She is also active in the Outreachy internship... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 10:55 - 11:35
Tyrolka

11:45

How Not to be a Good Linux Kernel Maintainer - Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz, Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. Z o.o.
Linux Kernel maintainers play an important role in the Linux Kernel ecosystem and are crucial for its success. With a constant growth of the number of Linux Kernel developers there is also a growing requirement for more maintainers (at various levels, from single driver to a major core subsystem). However there is little to none training or materials for the new maintainers. In this talk Bartlomiej will try to provide some advice on how to be a good Linux Kernel maintainer by describing most common mistakes done by maintainers (ranging from social to technical ones) based on his 15 years experience in Linux Kernel community and various roles full-filled during that time (from contributor to a major subsystem maintainer and from volunteer developer to a full-time kernel engineer). The talk will also address the evolution of the maintainer role and contain some future predictions.

Speakers
avatar for Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz

Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz

Senior Software Engineer, Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. z o.o.
Bartlomiej is a Senior Software Engineer at Samsung R&D Institute Poland. Currently, he is improving Linux Kernel support for Samsung ARM Exynos SoCs series. Zolnierkiewicz has been contributing into the Linux Kernel since 2002, working mostly on various device drivers. He was the... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
Tyrolka

11:45

Intro to Ceph, the Distributed Storage System - Gregory Farnum, Red Hat
Ceph is an open source distributed object store, network block device, and file system designed for reliability, performance, and scalability. With an advanced placement algorithm, active storage nodes, and peer-to-peer gossip protocols, Ceph is software-defined storage for scaling from terabytes to exabytes with no single point of failure. Powerful features like instantaneous snapshotting and copy-on-write clones, along with self-management and automatic healing, make Ceph friendly to administrators and users. This talk introduces the Ceph architecture and features in the latest upstream Luminous release, focusing on enhancements to the RADOS Block Device and CephFS distributed filesystem — including new horizontal metadata scaling.

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Farnum

Gregory Farnum

Principal Software Engineer, Ceph, Red Hat
Greg Farnum is a long-standing member of the core Ceph development group, having joined the project as the third full-time engineer after graduating from Harvey Mudd College in 2009. Now a Red Hat employee, Greg has done major work on all components of the Ceph ecosystem and currently... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
Berlin/Brussels

14:05

Jmake: Dependable Compilation for Kernel Janitors - Julia Lawall, Inria
The Linux kernel is the canonical example of highly configurable infrastructure software. In principle, any line of code can be included or excluded from the compiled kernel based on complex configuration operations that are not locally apparent. This poses a challenge for new developers who want to contribute to the code. How to tell if their code is actually being compiled? To address this issue, we propose JMake, a lightweight mutation-based tool for giving immediate feedback on whether each changed line has been subjected to the compiler. We illustrate the use of JMake on the commits between Linux v4.3 and v4.4, and find that JMake completes in most cases in under 30 seconds. We then characterize the situations in which changed code is not subjected to compilation in practice.

JMake is available at http://jmake-release.gforge.inria.fr/

Speakers
JL

Julia Lawall

Senior Researcher, Inria
Julia Lawall is a Senior Research Scientist at Inria. Her research is at the intersection of programming languages and operating systems. She develops the tool Coccinelle and has over 2000 patches in the Linux kernel based on this work. She is also active in the Outreachy internship... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 14:05 - 14:45
Berlin/Brussels

14:05

Making Trusted Boot Practical on Linux - Matthew Garrett, Google
TPMs can be used to record the state of the boot process, and that information can in turn be used to restrict access to secrets (such as disk encryption keys) in order to protect them against a compromised boot environment. Unfortunately this is easier said than done in Linux environments, as kernels are updated frequently and ramdisks are generated at install time. Keeping track of the expected values and ensuring that secrets aren't locked away from users becomes massively more difficult.

Thankfully, there is hope. A Microsoft-authored specification combines UEFI Secure Boot with TPM-based measured boot to reduce the number of individual measurements, making the problem much simpler. But the initramfs remains a problem. This presentation will cover the use of PCR 7 to provide TPM-based security without fragility, and propose solutions for handling trustworthy initramfs images.

Speakers
MG

Matthew Garrett

Staff Security Developer, Google
Matthew Garrett is a security developer at Google, working on infrastructural security for Linux desktop and mobile platforms.



Tuesday October 24, 2017 14:05 - 14:45
Tyrolka

14:05

The Linux Cryptographic API for Fun and Profit - Gilad Ben-Yossef, Arm Holdings
The Linux kernel has a rich cryptographic API which provides access to a modular implementation of symmetric and asymmetric block ciphers, hashes and digests which are either software implemented, use cryptographic acceleration in the core itself or in an external hardware accelerator from both kernel and user space and is used extensively by familiar user facing software such as Android.

The same API is also cryptic, somewhat ill-documented, subject to change and can easily bite you in unexpected and painful ways.

This tutorial will provide a short introduction to cryptography terms, describe the Linux crypto API and what can it be used for, provide usage example and, time permitting, discuss some of the more interesting in-kernel users, such as DM-Crypt, DM-Verity and the new fie system encryption code.

Speakers
avatar for Gilad Ben-Yossef

Gilad Ben-Yossef

Principal Software Engineer, Arm
Gilad Ben-Yossef is a principal software engineer working at Arm on upstream kernel security at large and Arm CryptCell engine support in particular. Gilad is the co-author of O’Reilly’s “Building Embedded Linux Systems” 2nd edition, co-founder of the Israeli FOSS NGO "HaMakor... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 14:05 - 15:35
Hercovka

14:55

Containerized Full-Stack Rust for IoT - Claus Matzinger, Microsoft
Rust's ability to work on many different platforms across the full stack is great, but how easy is it to use our favorite language from data collection to storage? Can a compiled Rust application work well in containers across CPU architectures and libc implementations? This talk will show challenges and solutions to implementing a containerized client-server application to collect images and IoT data, including but not limited to: Testing, serialization, CI, cross-compilation, drivers, and coroutines. 

Speakers
avatar for Claus Matzinger

Claus Matzinger

Technical Evangelist, Microsoft
Now at Microsoft, Claus used to run field engineering at Crate.io, the creators of CrateDB, a distributed SQL database. As a former CTO of a health startup and an Raspberry Pi and Rust (the programming language) enthusiast, Claus also maintains several drivers for sensors in the Rust... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 14:55 - 15:35
Tyrolka

14:55

Panel Discussion: Kernel Developer Panel - Moderated by Jonathan Corbet, LWN.net
Moderators
avatar for Jonathan Corbet

Jonathan Corbet

Executive Editor, LWN.net

Speakers
avatar for Laura Abbott

Laura Abbott

Fedora Kernel Engineer, Red Hat
Laura is currently employed Red Hat as a Fedora Kernel Engineer. Her day-to-day work involves bug fixes, tending the Fedora kernel releases, and other development work for the benefit of Fedora.
avatar for Vlastimil Babka

Vlastimil Babka

Linux Kernel Developer, SUSE
Vlastimil is a Linux kernel developer working at SUSE, focusing on memory management. Previously he was a Gentoo Linux developer.
avatar for Arnd Bergmann

Arnd Bergmann

Linux Kernel Developer, Linaro Ltd
Arnd Bergmann works for Linaro as one of the maintainers of the arm-soc tree, through which the platform specific code for ARM based SoCs are merged. As a long-time kernel contributor, he has worked on many CPU architectures and subsystems before that, and his current side interests... Read More →
avatar for Narcisa Vasile

Narcisa Vasile

Narcisa Vasile is a student at University Politehnica of Bucharest. She was an Outreachy intern in summer 2017.


Tuesday October 24, 2017 14:55 - 15:35
Berlin/Brussels

16:05

BOF: ARMing Fedora and CentOS: The State of ARM Support - Jim Perrin & Peter Robinson, Red Hat

 

In this BoF, the ARM maintainers for each distribution will compare and contrast the supported hardware, use cases, and implementation of ARM support. They'll also cover a basic roadmap for where they see ARM support going in the future, and answer audience questions about various ARM related issues.


Speakers
avatar for Peter Robinson

Peter Robinson

Principal IoT Architect, Red Hat
Peter is the lead architect for Linux IoT platforms at Red Hat. He's be at Red Hat over five years and done a number of roles, he's been an Open Source user and contributor since the mid 1990s, and has wide experience in IT from SME, large Telco/hosting providers and quite a bit in... Read More →


Tuesday October 24, 2017 16:05 - 16:45
Tyrolka

16:05

Using Persistent Memory to Build a High-Performance, Fully User Space File System - Krzysztof Czurylo, Intel
The pmemfile project is an attempt to provide low-overhead, high-performance
implementation of a POSIX-like file APIs on top of persistent memory. The pmemfile builds on libpmemobj, a transactional object store library
being a part of NVML (Non-Volatile Memory Library), as well as on Direct Access (DAX) capabilities, providing the most efficient access to persistent memory.
With the help of the syscall_intercept library, it can be used to transparently redirect all the file I/O calls to the user space file system, without modifying
the target application.
In this presentation we will discuss the architecture of pmemfile, the problems we faced during the implementation, as well as the advantages and limitations of our solution. We will also shed a light on the tools and libraries we used for pmemfile development.

Speakers
KC

Krzysztof Czuryło

Senior Software Engineer, Intel
Krzysztof Czuryło is a Software Architect at Intel, having over 15 years of experience in databases, networking/telecommunication and 3D graphics. For the last three years he is mostly focused on persistent memory programming and algorithms providing effective and fail-safe usage... Read More →



Tuesday October 24, 2017 16:05 - 16:45
Berlin/Brussels
  • Experience Level Any

16:55

Panel Discussion: Outreachy Kernel Internship Report - Moderated by Julia Lawall, Inria
Come learn about the great work our kernel interns have accomplished! Outreachy provides a 3-month paid internship for women, trans men, genderqueer people, and US members of other underrepresented groups to work on an open source project. The panel will present the program and this year's Linux kernel projects. Gargi Sharma will present her work on
replacing the PID bitmap implementation with an IDR API-based implementation. Sayli Karnik will talk about her improvements to the Linux kernel documentation​. Eva Rachel Retuya will present her work on developing the ADXL345 IIO driver to replace the existing input driver. Narcisa Vasile will present her work on writing a driver for CCS811 Air Quality
Sensor using the IIO interface. Varsha Rao will discuss her work on improving nftables. Bhumika Goyal will talk about securing the Linux kernel by declaring kernel structures read-only.

Moderators
JL

Julia Lawall

Senior Researcher, Inria
Julia Lawall is a Senior Research Scientist at Inria. Her research is at the intersection of programming languages and operating systems. She develops the tool Coccinelle and has over 2000 patches in the Linux kernel based on this work. She is also active in the Outreachy internship... Read More →

Speakers
BG

Bhumika Goyal

Bhumika Goyal has recently graduated from NIIT University, India. She is a former Outreachy intern. She is currently continuing her Outreachy project under Julia Lawall with the support of Core Infrastructure Initiative. She aims to become a Linux-kernel engineer in future.
avatar for Sayli Karnik

Sayli Karnik

Technology Analyst, Credit Suisse
I am a recent computer science graduate from Mumbai, India. I’m a technology enthusiast who loves digging deep into various aspects of computer science. I am currently a Technology analyst at Credit Suisse, India. Open source projects interest me tremendously. | | Open Source... Read More →
VR

Varsha Rao

Student
Varsha Rao is a final year student at National Institute of Engineering in India. | She was an Outreachy intern in summer 2017.
avatar for Eva Rachel Retuya

Eva Rachel Retuya

Eva Rachel Retuya is a computer engineering graduate based in the Philippines. She is a former Linux kernel Outreachy intern with interests in FOSS and Electronics. She is currently seeking opportunities in Linux kernel development and embedded systems.
GS

Gargi Sharma

Software Engineer, Bloomberg
Gargi worked as an Outreachy intern for the Linux Kernel during round 14. She worked on replacing the process ID allocation implementation with a radix tree. She currently works as a software engineer at Bloomberg LP, working on the buy side trading platform.
avatar for Narcisa Vasile

Narcisa Vasile

Narcisa Vasile is a student at University Politehnica of Bucharest. She was an Outreachy intern in summer 2017.



Tuesday October 24, 2017 16:55 - 17:35
Berlin/Brussels
  • Experience Level Any

16:55

Subverting the Linux Kernel - Jessica Yu
A 'rootkit' typically refers to malicious software that enables an attacker to mask or obscure traces of intrusion and secure further control on a compromised system. While userland rootkits generally modify specific system binaries, kernel rootkits are especially insidious and powerful in that this class of rootkits can enable an attacker to subvert the heart of the system, granting abilities to modify kernel data structures and code. This talk aims to provide a beginner's introduction to Linux kernel rootkits and an overview of common methods used by attackers to cover their tracks. Since most existing literature on kernel rootkits focus on older 2.6.x kernels, we'll update these methods for newer kernels as needed. We'll also briefly cover general defenses against kernel rootkits. The talk will conclude with a demo on a modern 4.x kernel that employs the discussed methods and techniques.

Speakers
JY

Jessica Yu

Software Engineer, Hobbyist
Jessica is a kernel developer maintaining the modules code in the linux kernel and working on kernel live patching.



Tuesday October 24, 2017 16:55 - 17:35
Tyrolka
 
Wednesday, October 25
 

11:15

syscall_intercept - A User Space Library for Intercepting System Calls - Krzysztof Czurylo, Intel
The syscall_intercept library provides a low-level interface for hooking Linux system calls in user space. This is achieved by disassembling the code of the standard C library, looking for syscall instructions and hot-patching the machine code in a process memory. The syscall_intercept builds on libcapstone - a multi-platform, multi-architecture disassembly framework.
In this talk, we will present the motivation for creating this new tool and the reasons for choosing the libcapstone framework as a foundation for syscall_intercept. We will present an in-depth view on the syscall_intercept design and APIs, its features and limitations, and the problems we had to solve while implementing the library. We will also discuss the potential use cases for syscall_intercept in Linux software development.

Speakers
KC

Krzysztof Czuryło

Senior Software Engineer, Intel
Krzysztof Czuryło is a Software Architect at Intel, having over 15 years of experience in databases, networking/telecommunication and 3D graphics. For the last three years he is mostly focused on persistent memory programming and algorithms providing effective and fail-safe usage... Read More →



Wednesday October 25, 2017 11:15 - 11:55
Berlin/Brussels
  • Experience Level Any

11:15

Understanding User Namespaces - Michael Kerrisk, man7.org Training and Consulting
User namespaces are at the heart of many interesting technologies that allow isolation and sandboxing of applications, for example running containers without root privileges and sandboxes for web browser plug-ins. In this presentation, we'll look in detail at user namespaces, building up a basic understanding of what a user namespace is and going on to questions such as: what does being "superuser inside a user namespace" allow you do (and what does it not allow); what is the relationship between user namespaces and other namespace types (PID, UTS, network, etc.); and what are the security implications of user namespaces? We'll also explore some simple shell commands that can be used for creating and experimenting with user namespaces in order to better understand how they work. We'll conclude with a brief survey of some use cases for user namespaces.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Kerrisk

Michael Kerrisk

Trainer/consultant, man7.org Training and Consulting
Michael Kerrisk is the author of the acclaimed book, "The Linux Programming Interface" (http://man7.org/tlpi/), a guide and reference for system programming on Linux and UNIX. He contributes to the Linux kernel primarily via documentation, review, and testing of new kernel-user-space... Read More →



Wednesday October 25, 2017 11:15 - 11:55
Tyrolka
  • Experience Level Any

12:05

OP-TEE - Using TrustZone to Protect Our Own Secrets - Marc Kleine-Budde, Pengutronix e.K.
The TrustZone feature in ARM v7/8 CPUs promises to protect sensitive data even with a compromised kernel. Although it could be used for securing VPN keys, running a TPM in software or handling feature licenses, TrustZone has been largely ignored by the Linux community. Currently, the most widespread use for TEEs (Trusted Execution Environments) seems to be proprietary DRM for video streaming on Android. This is about to change, because since the merge of the OP-TEE infrastructure in Linux 4.12, we how have a standardized interface with a fully open source implementation. We can now run small applications separately from the normal Linux world, protecting the user's data instead of hiding data from the user.

In this presentation, Marc will explain the underlying technology and how it can be used. He will also report on which parts are still missing for full functionality.

Speakers
avatar for Marc Kleine-Budde

Marc Kleine-Budde

Developer, Pengutronix e.K.
Marc Kleine-Budde started using Linux in 1995, he works for Pengutronix e.K. in Hildesheim after he got his diploma in Electrical Engineering specialized in Computer Engineering in 2005 at Leibniz University Hannover. At Pengutronix he is working on the Linux Kernel and low level... Read More →


Wednesday October 25, 2017 12:05 - 12:45
Berlin/Brussels

12:05

printk() - It's Old, What Can We Do to Make It Young Again? - Steven Rostedt, VMware & Sergey Senozhatsky, Samsung Electronics
printk() has been the tool for debugging the Linux kernel and for being the display mechanism for Linux as long as Linux has been around. It's the first thing one sees as the life of the kernel begins, from the kernel banner and the last message at shutdown. It's critical as people take pictures of a kernel oops to send to the kernel developers to fix a bug, or to display on social media when that oops happens on the monitor on the back of an airplane seat in front of you.

But printk() is not a trivial utility. It serves many functionalities and some of them can be conflicting. Today with Linux running on machines with hundreds of CPUs, printk() can actually be the cause of live locks. This talk will first give a review of what was discussed onMonday in "printk() - the most useful tool now showing its age", but will also include various ideas to fix its issues, and hopefully what will be accepted at Kernel Summit.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Rostedt

Steven Rostedt

Open Source Programmer, VMware
Steven Rostedt is one of the original developers of the Real Time (PREEMPT_RT) patch. He currently maintains the v4.14-rt stable branch. Steven has been an active Linux kernel developer since 1998 where he converted the TCP/IP stack from a send/ack stack to a credit/nack stack for... Read More →
avatar for Sergey Senozhatsky

Sergey Senozhatsky

Senior Engineer, Samsung Electronics
Sergey Senozhatsky currently works for Samsung Electronics, VD division, Korea.He is the co-maintainer of the printk() code. He is also a distinguished reviewer and developer for the upstream zsmalloc memory allocator and zram compressing block device driver.



Wednesday October 25, 2017 12:05 - 12:45
Tyrolka

14:15

Replacing the Radix Tree - Matthew Wilcox, Microsoft
Last year I gave a talk extolling the benefits of the Linux radix tree. This year I am talking about its shortcomings, what I did to improve things, and how I came to the conclusion that it had to be replaced.

The new XArray is easier to use than the radix tree. Conceptually, it is an array of 16 quintillion pointers, all of which are initially NULL. Just like an array, its basic operations are 'load' and 'store', unlike a tree's 'lookup', 'insert' and 'delete'. It provides some more advanced operations, and enables users to build their own operations.

This talk covers general aspects of API design for C programmers, as well as particular considerations for kernel API design due to the constrained environment.

Speakers
MW

Matthew Wilcox

Kernel hacker, Oracle
Matthew had his first kernel patch accepted in 1998. Since then he has worked on many parts of the Linux kernel including leading the PA-RISC Linux port, maintaining the file locking code, SCSI, USB, NVM Express, and Persistent Memory. He currently works for Microsoft.



Wednesday October 25, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
Tyrolka

14:15

Workshop: Continuous Integration with the Open Build Service - Eduardo Navarro & Björn Geuken, SUSE Linux GmbH
Getting a new Linux appliance with every commit you push sounds awesome but impossible, right? Not with the Open Build Service (OBS), the Free Software build and distribution system which powers openSUSE, ownCloud and Tizen! Usually a lot of manual work is necessary to create your custom Linux appliance, but the Open Build Service abstracts all the complicated technologies and makes this task as easy as pie. In this workshop, we will show you how we plug several open source technologies together to create Linux appliances in a fully automated, continuous integration cycle.

This hands-on workshop will cover the package and image building process in OBS. The attendees will learn in several exercises how to setup an OBS project to automatically create a ready-to-use image of an operating system.

Speakers
BG

Björn Geuken

Björn Geuken is member of the SUSE Build Solutions team responsible for the Ruby on Rails frontend of the Open Build Service.
avatar for Eduardo Navarro

Eduardo Navarro

Build Service engineer, SUSE Linux GmbH


Wednesday October 25, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
Berlin/Brussels

15:05

Reproducible Builds - We Made Lots of Progress in Many Places, But We're Still Far From Our Goals of Changing the (Software) World - Holger Levsen
Reproducible builds enable everyone to verify that a given binary is made from the source it is claimed to be made from, by enabling anyone to create bit by bit identical binaries.

This talk will report on the state of reproducible builds in various distributions (Debian, Archlinux, coreboot, F-Droid, Fedora, FreeBSD, Guix, NetBSD, OpenWrt, SuSE, and Qubes OS - to name a few) and thus should be interesting and insightful for anyone working on any free software project.

Holger will explain how he started working on this in the Debian context and how his focus shifted slightly over the time. So he will start with explaining the status of Reproducible Debian, but this is quickly followed by an overview of common problems and solutions, followed by a quick explaination of the shared test infrastructure for reproducible tests of any project. You will learn how the community was broadened, what future plans we have to address what might be needed beyond being able to reproducible build something, so this becomes truly meaningful for users in practice.

In this talk you will also learn about the challanges we're facing to deliver on the promise. Being able to reproducibly build in theory is not enough, one needs to be able to do so in practice. And enabling this on a distro scale is much harder than we thought…

Speakers
avatar for Holger Levsen

Holger Levsen

Senior Reality Engineer, Holger Levsen
Holger Levsen has been a Debian user for 20 years and started contributing 15 years ago. He got involved in doing QA work on Debian in 2007 via first working on piuparts, which led him to start https://jenkins.debian.net in 2012. At the end of 2013 he had the idea to use this jenkins... Read More →



Wednesday October 25, 2017 15:05 - 15:45
Tyrolka

16:15

seccomp(2) vs pledge(2) - Giovanni Bechis, SNB S.r.l.
seccomp is a computer security facility in the Linux kernel, pledge is a similar security facility in the OpenBSD kernel. In this presentation Giovanni Bechis will review the development story and progress of both kernel interfaces and will analyze the main differences. There will be some examples of implementations of security patches made for some important open source projects.

Speakers
avatar for Giovanni Bechis

Giovanni Bechis

Ceo / Software Developer, SNB S.r.l.
I started working with Linux and *BSD in late 90's, I worked as Linux and FreeBSD system administrator in a software house. In 2005 I founded my own software house, we create web solutions, hosting and ICT solutions. From 2008 I am an OpeBSD committer and I develop ports and some... Read More →



Wednesday October 25, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
Tyrolka

16:15

What's New with ftrace? - Steven Rostedt, Vmware
Ftrace is the official tracer of the Linux kernel. It's been a while since I last talked about what is in ftrace. But I haven't stopped developing more features. This talk will give a very brief overview of a intro to ftrace, but then focus on what has been added in the last few years. There's multiple instance, a new file system to mount it on, stack tracing, variable per cpu buffer sizes, better tracing of forked process, and much more. Most of this is document in the kernel documentation, but I find very few people read that. This talk will have lots of demos, to see how to actual use tracing for those that prefer action over reading about the action.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Rostedt

Steven Rostedt

Open Source Programmer, VMware
Steven Rostedt is one of the original developers of the Real Time (PREEMPT_RT) patch. He currently maintains the v4.14-rt stable branch. Steven has been an active Linux kernel developer since 1998 where he converted the TCP/IP stack from a send/ack stack to a credit/nack stack for... Read More →



Wednesday October 25, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
Berlin/Brussels

17:05

Transactional Updates with btrfs and RPMs - Thorsten Kukuk, SUSE
Applying small updates is normally no problem in a running system. But what about if there is a new major release of your favorite Desktop? Or a major version update of your used Linux distribution? Today’s concepts are most of the time to apply the patches in the running system and risk that a running service or Desktop breaks, or apply them all during boot and wait for quite some time until you can access your machine again.
A solution for this are transactional updates.

Transactional updates are atomic, means either they applied successful, or if an error occurred, you have the same state as before. And if an update does not work, there is an easy way to go back to the last working state. The update is done in the background without influencing the system.

There are different solutions for this, I want to leverage btrfs for this and use standard tools and package managers.

Speakers
avatar for Thorsten Kukuk

Thorsten Kukuk

Distinguished Engineer, SUSE
Thorsten Kukuk has a master degree in computer science and started with Linux in 1992. Since 1999 he is working for SUSE. Formerly as release manager, now as Senior Architect SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. He was, among others, involved in the following open source projects: glibc... Read More →



Wednesday October 25, 2017 17:05 - 17:45
Tyrolka

17:05

Why Should We Care About Kernelnewbies! - Vaishali Thakkar, Oracle
Linux kernel being one of the largest open source project, attracts many newish programmers. But do they really end up contributing to the project? What are the common technical and non-technical issues faced by them while contributing to the Linux kernel? Why should one care about kernelnewbies as a kernel developer/maintainer? As a community, what kind of actions can be taken to improve the situation?

In last 1.5 year, Vaishali conducted many Linux kernel workshops in Indian universities and local meetup groups. In this talk, she would like to take a look at the answers of above mentioned questions based on her experiences with kernelnewbies.

Speakers
avatar for Vaishali Thakkar

Vaishali Thakkar

Linux kernel engineer, Freelancer
Vaishali Thakkar is a freelance kernel engineer and co-organizer of RGSoC. She has diverse interest in different areas/subsystems of Linux Kernel, including but not limited to I2C, Security, memory management. power management etc. She also volunteers as a coordinator for Linux Kernel... Read More →



Wednesday October 25, 2017 17:05 - 17:45
Berlin/Brussels
  • Experience Level Any